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This item was posted on December 18, 2010, and it was categorized as Climate Change, EarthArt.
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I came across the image above while doing some research for my next post (which, by the way, will explain the differences between the three major analyses of global temperature anomalies — look for it Tuesday). The graphic is related to climate change research. But that’s the only hint I’ll provide.

Can yo figure out what it portrays? Share your ideas in the comments section. The first person to guess correctly will get a free, lifetime subscription to CEJournal!

Okay, I jest.  The first person to guess correctly will be prominently mentioned here, earning the accolades of, well, at least hundreds, and with a bit of luck, maybe even thousands!

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This thing has 4 Comments

  1. paulina
    Posted December 18, 2010 at 11:49 am | Permalink

    Not sure, but maybe it’s the latitude-time section of zonal average annual anomalies for precipitation over land from 1900 to 2005, relative to their 1961 to 1990 means?

    Where the reddish brown is, like, 15% dryer than the mean, and blue is, say, abt 15% wetter, and it goes, from dry to wet, non-linearly: red, brown, beige, white, light green, green, darker green, blue? And gray=no data?

  2. Posted December 18, 2010 at 12:15 pm | Permalink

    Paulina took the words out of my mouth. All that remains to be added is the source: IPCC AR4.

  3. Posted December 18, 2010 at 3:43 pm | Permalink

    Wow! No sooner did I post this than you guys got the answer!

    I need to come up with more difficult puzzles.

    I’ll follow up tomorrow with more details.

  4. paulina
    Posted December 19, 2010 at 9:11 pm | Permalink

    The image really is pretty darn cool, isn’t it?

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